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minute history expected to be made at the united nations. palestinians on the verge of gaining a new status at the u.n. but the u.s. isn't so happy about this one. we'll take you there live next. ♪ ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> u. (voting at this hour on whether to make palestine a nonmember observer state. just a latest chapter in the effort to become a status. >> reporter: the final rally before heading to new york. palestinian president abbas addressing supporters in ramallah. the final decision to head to the united nations tomorrow he says to enhance the position of palestine to an observer state in the united nations and it is the first step to achieve all our national palestinian rights. if the palestinians win a majority in the u.n. general assembly the u.n. will recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state like the vatican, the territory to include the west bank, gaza and east jerusalem. >> for the world to begin to
nations would be able to tell people in the united states how to deal with his daughter isabella and some republicans were citing that as a reason for rejecting the treaty. what do you say in. >> i have great respect for both rick and his wife and their daughter and family, he's a strong family man. he either simply hasn't read the treaty or doesn't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero -- i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. there is no ability to go to court. there is not one requirement of a change in american law. and there is no way to tell an american parent anything. now, that is according to our supreme court of the united states. that's according to the language in the treaty itself. and this is a treaty that was negotiated by republican president george herbert walker bush. it was signed by george walker bush at the u.n., and republican attorney general richard thornbur
republicans about the expected nomination of united nations ambassador susan rice. for secretary of state. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge connects the dots. >> at high risk sites including the benj consulate the internal state department reported 2009 recorded physical barriers like this one to prevent the overrunning of the diplomatic facility. closed hearing before the senate homeland security committee, witnesses testified the changes were never made in benghazi. >> disconcerting to see how easily they broke through the gates and walked in. >> the committee questions the striking similarities between the 1998 al-qaeda bombing of the u.s. embassy in east africa that killed 12 americans and injured 4,000 others. in 1998, susan rice was 33 years old and running the state department abrica section. >> ambassador to kenya sent repeated messages to the state department requesting a stronger p facility because of the increased threat. and those requests, as in the case of benghazi, were turned down by the state department. >> some say rice has baggage beyond the benghazi
, that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time, it was a working level staff position. her first in government. ambassador rice could make announcements, but wouldn't be involved in making such an important decision about getting involved militarily in rwanda and president clinton said he made the decision. it was the greatest mistake of his presidency. and susan rice traveled to rwanda shortly after the genocide and said seeing the horrors of rwanda, the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what actually made her passionate about the issue of preventing genocide in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she returned when she became u.n. ambassador, spoke about that experience and there's also a quote from her in the book reference by rabbi shmuley in which she swore that if she ever faced a crisis like that again, she would argue for dramatic action and then in her words, go down in flames. >> so, why religious leaders, especially these two, speakin
at the united nations first to james rosen at the state department and to james nato is taking steps to minimize the amount landing outside of syria. >> that's right, shep. the foreign ministers of the military alliance gathered in brussels today and announced there that they have approved a request made by member state turkey which asked for u.s.-made patriot antimissile batteries to be installed along its southern border syria. the ministry made clear the systems are purely defensive. germany and netherlands are supplying the pac three model as soon as their respective parliaments approve the deal which is expected to come soon. >> when that exactly will happen will depend on a number of practical issues that will be sorted out in the very near future. so i can't give you an exact date but i will tell you that the actual deployment of missiles will take place within weeks. >> hundreds of nato troops will also be deployed to install and operate these antimissile weapons but it doesn't appear right now that they will be u.s. troops, shep. >> shepard: sheriffs clinton was at that meeting in bruss
u.s. ambassador to the united nation, john bolten, judith mill eric and ed qlien. we begin with the closed door briefs on benghazi that lawmakers say raises more questions than ever that the obama administration insisted the attack was the response of a demonstration prompted by rage over an anti-islam video. fox news correspondent with the latest on what lawmakers saw and heard today from the country's top intelligence officials. >> the closed classified briefing brought together seen your state department, intelligence, and counterterrorism officials for a report on the three-month old investigation into the benghazi terrorist attacks. >> to the degree there was planning involved, something done over days, weeks, or over hours? no indication of long term planning here. >> the attacks cronology was laid oillet in a multimedia presentation with drone surveillance and video from the consulate of the cia and annex. >> this is supposed to be sovereign u.s. territory, and if people walk in on us like that without resistance really makes your blood boil because you think to your
united nations to take control of the internet? jon: just in. new information out of egypt. reuters is reporting that egyptian president mohammed morsi has left the presidential palace after protesters fight with riot police outside the palace. of course he has been under intense pressure from his own people ever since he assumed autocratic powers and he has been engaged in a fight with the court system there. people have been very angry about what he has done. at any rate according to reuters he has left the presidential palace because of this, well, call them, demonstration, call them a mob. i'm not sure how you want to describe it but those are pictures outside the presidential palace in cairo. night has fallen there. we'll keep an eye on the situation. we have our steve harrigan there. we'll let you know as soon as we learn more. jenna: disturbing new signs al qaeda is on the rebound in parts of the middle east and after frica. the latest a large-scale al qaeda plot in jordan. they plan to hit deadly terror attacks in the capital and hit the u.s. embassy during the chaos. behind
at the united nations this afternoon. it seems there is a battle for a capital city that could be shaping up and that is crucially important. >>jonathan: yes. there is no doubt we have entered a new and very significant stage in the battle for syria and that is in essence of battle for the capital of damascus which has been going on for five or six days. president bashar al-assad wants do and indeed has to hang on to the capital if he is to stay in power. there are many experts who believe either way, he has decided to fight to the death. either if he tries to flow he will be killed by his own supporters who will feel betrayed him him or ultimately he will be killed by the rebels. this, while it does seem to be the end days for the bashar al-assad regime, it could yet stretch on for some days or even weeks. that because the rebels simply are not strong enough to defeat the syrian security forces in one battle. what we are seeing is an intense battle of attrition. most experts will tell you, his days are numbered. >> the big question on the international stage now, jonathan, will he use the c
that appears on your screen. ♪ ♪ >> bret: secretary general of the united nations is the latest world leader to warn syria against using chemical weapons. there are indications tonight syria's embattled president may be working on an exit strategy. correspondent connor powell is watching from jerusalem. >> in the heart of damascus, syrian forces fire rockets on nearby rebel additions. the fighting moving closer to the assad regime headquarters. this comes as secretary of state hillary clinton today reiterated her warnings to syrian president bashar assad against using chemical weapons. once again, saying it would cross a red line. senior syrian official refused to confirm the existence of the weapons but denied the government is considering using them in the fight, despite intelligence reports to the contrary. >> our concerns are that increasingly desperate assad regime might turn to chemical weapons. or might lose criminal of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. >> groups according to the u.s. intelligence reports that are affiliated with al-qaeda. and are inc
and the united nations. prime minister, thanks, as usual, for joining us. >> thank you, wolf. >> good to see you the other day in jerusalem. let's talk about what's happening in the middle east right now. the u.s., the obama administration, nato now obviously very concerned about the regime of president assad potentially using chemical weapons, poison gas against its own people. here's the question, what is the difference killing civilians in syria with bombs from jet fighters or attack helicopters as opposed to using say poison gas or chemical warfare? >> that's a good question. in one sense in moral terms, there is no difference and almost 40,000 people have died in syria already. but i think the use of chemical weapons and poison gas, i think the fatalities would be very much greater. and it does cross a line. these aren't judgments that you can make in any scientific way. but i think what your administration, the international community is signaling to president assad, if you cross that line, there will be a strong reaction. >> those are tough words coming from president obama, from secretar
as the united states is concerned. the president over at the national defense university was celebrating today. he was celebrating what was create a program to eliminate nuclear weapons that were a leftover after the collapse of the soviet union. the u.s. provides lots of money and experts to help with the job. the program's responsible for deactivating more than 7,000 nuclear warheads over the past two decades, in addition, some 900 intercontinental ballistic missiles and 6.5 million pounds of chemical weapons material have been destroyed thanks to the program. >>> hillary clinton has served president obama for four years as secretary of state. four years from now, could she be moving into her boss' office over at the white house? after this weekend, a lot more people are beginning to speculate about what hillary clinton is planning to do. our "strategy session," james carville and mary matlin, are both standing by live. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit m
't believe the u.n. should sign on as party to any united nations convention and because a two-thirds super majority is rard to ratify a treaty, that opposition means it will be close and they may lose. yesterday kerry told reporters he is about four votes short but thinks a handful of senators might still be willing to sign on. in an effort to win those 11th hour votes, former senator bob dole who was there when the ada, americans for disability act, was negotiated and signed in the early '90s, is expected to be present on the senate floor or at least right next to the floor when the vote actually takes place. of course dole was just optized at walter reed army medical center last week. his public appearances are very, very rare these days. he'll be honored late they are morning and then he'll be sitting there watching as some senators potentially walk by him to make that decision to vote against a treaty that he has been campaigning very hard for. the tough time this treaty is having is the latest sign of the growing isolationist party. yesterday the president used a speech celebrating th
forward with plans for two major settlements in the eastern part of the country. this following the united nation's recognition of palestine as a nonmember observer state. governor mitt romney, we haven't said that in a little while, returning to corporate life, marriott says the former republican presidential nominee is rejoining their board of directors, which he left late last -- early last year i should say. and house speaker john boehner set to light the capitol christmas tree hours from now. the tree is 65 feet high, an engleman spruce from the white river national forest in colorado. beautiful. bill: usually it's jersey. new details about the final hours of jovan belcher apartments life. he spent the night with another woman before going home in the morning fighting with his girlfriend, cassandra perkins and shooting her repeatedly. many people report he was drunk the night before and spent the night at the home of another woman. dr. keith ablow is here. take us through the details. he fell asleep in his car outside the home of another woman, woken by the police inside the car, went
lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: vote: vote: the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 61, the nays are 38, two-thirds of the senators present not having voted in the affirmative, the resolution of ratification is not agreed to. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: both senator mcconnell and i have approv
to grow. that's going to become a problem that neither the syrian opposition nor the united states is -- or any other western or other nation is going to want to see materialize. given just how volatile the region already is. as long as the battle takes place. as long as the extreme fighters are the ones willing to take up arms in some cases bringing in significant amounts of money with them. that is all the opposition has to turn to. they are trying to control these groups. but they will admit they're very frustrated and disgruntled by this. these various students do not follow the rebel chain of command. they're not necessarily following orders by the syrian army. they may be trying to reign them in, they're growing more powerful by the day. >> stay safe arwa, thank you very much. she's doing an amazing job for all of us. >>> the looming fiscal cliff could force politicians to make some tough decisions. one of the hardest could involve a popular tax break enjoyed by millions of americans, we have details just ahead. stay with us in the situation room. two years ago, the people of
point. on your second point, the opec nations in being friends of the united states, i think the answer to that is that both sides have had a relationship that has been economically necessary, but i do not think the opec cartel conducts its affairs in a way to benefit the united states of america. they conduct their affairs so that they do not kill the goose that laid the golden egg. if you turn into the record on pages 8 and 9, you're asking for some visual clues as to what's going on here. if you look on page 8 coming will see the united states is paying about $20 million per month to import petroleum. you see the sharp rise in the line just before 2008 and then it sort of flat lines from 2008 going through the significant dip that was represented by the subprime mortgage meltdown. what's interesting about it is from that point forward it has remained about 50% of the balance of payments and deficits. that is because the oil cartel prices the marginal barrel of oil as what it costs to get it out of the ground and what the maximum is that they cannot pay without tipping the consumers o
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)